The Best Boston Historical Sites to Visit - historicalb.com

The Best Boston Historical Sites to Visit


boston historical sites

When considering Boston historical sites, visitors should not forget the Old Boston Church and the Old John Hancock Tower. Global Panorama/ Flickr. Walking these buildings is like taking a journey back in time. Both the church and the tower were built during the colonial era, and both have architectural beauty to appreciate.

Boston Common/ Flickr

A large old building with many windows

The Old John Hancock Tower is one of the landmarks in Boston that provides an easy entry to the famed “Green Monster.” This skyscraper was built in 1869 and served as the home of the first United States government. The Freedom Trail follows the historic path of the Freedom Trail all the way from the Common to the Back Bay. The park offers spectacular panoramas of the Boston cityscape and is especially beautiful at night. The park has been closed to automobiles for several years, so taking a walking trip on the Freedom Trail is a great way to enjoy the night life and enjoy the fresh air.

Charles Darwin’s Pigeon Forge Site

A person standing in front of a building

Legend has it that a Spanish shipwrecked near the North End of Boston was where the great naturalist got his idea for “The Origin of Species.” In 1776, while sailing nearby, Darwin noticed a small animal swimming across the bay. Later that year he wrote about this animal to the Royal Society in London, and the name “Pigeon Forge” was given to the location.

The burial site of Samuel Adams and Francis Scott Key are also located near the North End. Nearby is the burial site of Paul Revere. Some of the other significant sites include: the Old North Church, Christ Church, King’s Chapel, and the National Historic Landmark. All of these sites are located within walking distance of downtown Boston. The Freedom Trail passes through all of these important Boston historical sites.

King’s Chapel

King’s Chapel is located at the center of downtown Boston. This beautiful park offers visitors a wonderful view of the city. It is also home to the oldest tea house in America, the King’s Chapel Teahouse. Many historical sites can be seen on this trail.

Other Historical Places In Boston

The burying ground. The point where Commonwealth avenue and Boylston street meat are the historic burial ground of the Bostonians. Here they have been preserving and protecting for many years. They have managed to keep this area a secret even though it is a popular tourist destination. Burial sites can be viewed at various times during the year, but during certain times of the year visitors are more likely to see the beautiful flowers and plants as well as the history of this place.

The Boston Public Library. This is a must visit if you are a history buff. On one corner of this building is the Charles Darwin House. Here you will find the birthplace of the great naturalist. All around this lovely park is great history and a glimpse into the past of Boston.

The Boston Common. A visit to the Boston Common does not have to include a walk around its grounds. On a hot summer day this is a nice way to cool off in the shade under the shade trees. Very popular historical site here is the bunker hill.

The Boston Common’s burial ground. Some people think this park is cursed because it was where the first president of the United States was buried. It is actually his personal birthplace just below the hill on which the monument now stands. Some people also believe that this is where Martin Luther King died.

In The End

Of course there are many more historic sites all throughout Boston that anyone can see and enjoy. If you want to spend a nice day at the zoo or shopping or dining in one of the city’s fine restaurants then there are plenty of ways to get the most out of a day in this beautiful city. If you like history and enjoy visiting historical sites then a visit to one or all of these Boston historical sites is a must do for any visitor to the state of Massachusetts.

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